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Your City Collection, now online

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For the first time you can now view key works from the Gold Coast’s impressive City Collection online, from wherever you are.

The City began collecting works in 1968 and the impressive collection now features more than 4,500 works, valued at approximately $32 million, including one of the biggest collections of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander art in regional Australia. You can read more about the City Collection here.

And when HOTA Gallery opens in May we’ll be able to show you that the collection contains so much more than you ever imagined, as we display never before seen works over three gallery spaces.

But if you can’t wait until May then you’re in luck! Over the last five years we’ve been busy behind the scenes restoring, photographing and cataloguing the collection and next week you’ll be able to explore the collection online.

You’ll be able to search for works by artist, production date, material, even colour. And you’ll be able to read about the works, keep a list of your favourites, and see what will be on display in the gallery (from May).

The online catalogue, managed by our gallery team, has been created by a company called Vernon; who also manage the online collection of other galleries including Hayward Gallery Southbank Centre (UK), Christchurch Art Gallery (NZ), National Gallery of Victoria, and Art Gallery New South Wales, and MONA in Tasmania.

While there’s currently just over 200 pieces online eventually the entire collection will be available on the database, get ready to explore!

Explore the City Collection Online

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HOTA proudly acknowledges the Traditional Custodians of the land on which we are situated, the Kombumerri families of the Yugambeh Language Region. We pay our respects to their Elders past, present and emerging, and recognise their continuing connections to the lands, waters and their extended communities throughout South East Queensland.

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